Documents

British Central Arbitration Committee to establish Deliveroo’s riders are self-employed persons.
The British Central Arbitration Committee, the dispute settlement body, has determined that bicycle drivers offering services through the Deliveroo transport platform are independent contractors, not paid workers with labour rights on the platform.
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Judgment of the Labour Court of the UK of 28 October 2016 declaring that the drivers are Uber employees.
In what was one of the first judgments in Europe on the dispute between drivers providing transport services in Uber and the platform itself over whether they are self-employed or salaried workers on the platform, the decision of the British Labour Court determined that they are its workers and therefore deserve labour rights.
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Judgment of the Civil Court of Rome (Italy) of 6 April 2017 prohibiting Uber.
This ruling prohibits Uber because of the unfair competition that the transport platform is making to the taxi sector, following the decision of a court in Milan in May 2015 that ruled in the same way.
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CJUE Uber’s resolution, Dec 2017 – Uber is a transportation company
The ‘CJUE UBER’s resolution’ from December 2017 was an important judicial decision which clear the situation regarding Uber platform at Spain: it’s an intermediator or a service provider? It points out that the service provided by Uber is not only intermediation but “creates at the same time an offer of urban transport services” (paragraphs 38 et seq): a transport company like any other, but where the main way of acting and attracting clients is digital.
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Ride On! Mobility Business Models for the Sharing Economy
The public perception of shared goods has changed substantially in the past few years. While co-owning properties has been widely accepted for a while (e.g., timeshares), the notion of sharing bikes, cars, or even rides on an on-demand basis is just now starting to gain widespread popularity. The emerging “sharing economy” is particularly interesting in the context of cities that struggle with population growth and increasing density. While sharing vehicles promises to reduce inner-city traffic, congestion, and pollution problems, the associated business models are not without problems themselves. Using agency theory, in this article we discuss existing shared mobility business models in an effort to unveil the optimal relationship between service providers (agents) and the local governments (principals) to achieve the common objective of sustainable mobility. Our findings show private or public models are fraught with conflicts, and point to a merit model as the most promising alignment of the strengths of agents and principals.
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